Government / Politics

[nytimes] The Problem of American Diplomacy


Reposted from: The New York Times (14 November 2012)

Christopher Stevens and the Problem of American Diplomacy

A great article that illuminates a perspective in historical context many people do not see.  The definition of diplomacy requires its envoys to take risks in order to accomplish the mission.  Unfortunately, security of personnel or an entire compound can actually impede the effectiveness of diplomacy by sending the wrong message to our resident communities.

Excerpt:

“Lost in all this partisan wrangling was the fact that American diplomacy has already undergone vast changes in the past few decades and is now so heavily encumbered by fortresslike embassies, body armor and motorcades that it is almost unrecognizable. In 1985 there were about 150 security officers in U.S. embassies abroad, and now there are about 900. That does not include the military officers and advisers, whose presence in many embassies — especially in the Middle East — can change the atmosphere. Security has gone from a marginal concern to the very heart of American interactions with other countries.

“The barriers are there for a reason: Stevens’s death attests to that, as do those of Americans in Beirut, Baghdad and other violent places. But the reaction to the attack in Benghazi crystallized a sense among many diplomats that risks are less acceptable in Washington than they once were, that the mantra of “security” will only grow louder. As a result, some of the country’s most distinguished former ambassadors are now asking anew what diplomacy can achieve at such a remove.”

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